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C-2-C Project

Creator-to-Consumer in a Digital Age

C-2-C Postgraduate Courses

Background and Introduction

This aspect of the C-2-C project involved the development of an accredited courses in Digital Supply Chain Management, for the purpose of engaging a new generation of workers and managers in the process of creating new products for new markets.

The courses are to be be offered at various levels of accreditation at:

  1. Certificate;
  2. Diploma; and
  3. Master’s levels.

Based on the new knowledge created in Modules 1 and 2 of the C-2-C Project, three Master’s level programs will be lauched in 2004, each of which can also be offered (based on the principle of ‘seamless progression’) at certificate and diploma levels:

  1. The MBA (Industry Specialisation). The proposed courses will be an integral part of the current strategy to develop a suite of post-VET courses at the International Centre for Graphic Technology, RMIT Brunswick.
  2. Master of Communications. Supplementing existing courses, with a focus on digital publishing.
  3. Master of Education. Supplementing existing courses by adding a focus on online learning, educational publishing and instructional design.
Designed to complement RMIT’s planned undergraduate Printing degree program, the course will be offered commencing 2004:
  1. At RMIT Brunswick.
  2. Through the state-based delivery points of the Australian Technology Network Universities (University of Technology, Sydney; Curtin University; Queensland University of Technology; University of South Australia).
  3. Through on-selling arrangements to other educational providers.
  4. In a purely online environment through Open Learning Australia, with a special focus on serving the education and training needs of regional Australia.
  5. Internationally, to fee paying students.

This course development work has been designed to assist in the transformation of RMIT and partner providers from their traditional trainer and technical skills base into a ‘future-industry needs’ base.

Our market analysis in the current phase of the C-2-C Project has indicated a dearth of courses/programs in the proposed areas in Australia, and none dealing systematically with the cutting-edge technical and commercial issues which have emerged through the C-2-C research. The C-2-C Project Advisory Committee would be asked to remain as a program advisory committee, and this would also include a commitment to promote the program and support students to enrol.

C-2-C Online Courses

  1. PRINT AND ETEXT CONVERGENCE:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    Print and eText Convergence examines the changing nature of printing and other emerging information transmission technologies, with a critical view to interpreting the commercial and cultural impacts of these changes. The course discusses the development of the printing industry, with a particular focus on the social and commercial aspects of the emergence of the printed book. The third quarter of the twentieth century has witnessed what is often regarded as the beginnings of a ‘digital revolution’, significantly impacting on people and professions involved in the creation and dissemination of published texts. Print and eText Convergence investigates the dimensions of this change, in which printed matter and other ephemeral forms of text (computer screens, refreshable reading devices) are increasingly manufactured from digital sources and delivered from creator to consumer using digital processes.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
  2. COPYRIGHT AND DIGITAL RIGHTS MANAGEMENT:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    Copyright, or the private ownership of intellectual property, emerged in its modern form with the development of technologies for the mass production of the printed book. Developments in digital technologies, however, appear to present a significant challenge to copyright. Notable amongst these at the turn of the twenty-first century is the ‘Napster’ phenomenon, in which unencrypted music files were freely shared across the internet. Copyright and Digital Rights Management explores the nature of copyright as it has emerged in contemporary legal jurisdictions, and possible directions for copyright in the digital age. On the one hand, the digital environment can be used to enforce copyright more rigorously than ever before via digital rights management extensions to electronic files (encryption, pay-per-view etc.). On the other hand, the digital environment has thrown up a series of challenging and politically charged claims around freedom of speech and access to information. The course will examine the legal and commercial bases of open source software, free software licenses and the notion of a copyright commons. It will also examine the heated debates around copyright laws, such as the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act, designed t to address copyright issues in the digital age.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
  3. MULTILITERACIES AND INFORMATION ARCHITECTURES:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    Multiliteracies and Information Architectures examines the changing nature of published text, and the social and cultural impacts of these changes. Literacy, or the mass access to the printed word, transformed the ways of communicating, thinking and acting characteristic of primarily oral cultures. The form of the book, for instance, represented a radically new information architecture, and thus a new way of making meaning. Arguably, the information architecture of the printed book and the consequent formation of a literate society, played a significant part in shaping the modern world?commercially, culturally and technologically. The key question for this course is: to what extent and in what ways will digital forms of communication create another wave of change? How is the information architecture of the internet in some respects similar but in other respects different to that of the book? The concept of ‘multiliteracies’ will be developed to account for some of the key elements of this change, and the possible move towards new cultures and commercial environments in which a different kind of literacy is required.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
  4. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN, E-LEARNING AND EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    Significant changes are occurring in educational publishing and the creation of curriculum resource materials. These are in part a consequence of the development of digital text creation and transmission technologies and business models. Frequently appearing under the name ‘elearning’, these innovations have evoked a variety of responses. On the one hand, it is claimed that elearning involves little more than a translation of older ‘textbook’ forms which, with the partial or complete removal of face to face teaching, leads to a reduction in the quality of the learning experience. On the other hand, more optimistic claims are made that the digital environment creates the potential for the development of non-linear learning environments which cater more effectively to learner needs, including diverse interests and learning styles. Instructional Design, E-Learning and Educational Publishing explores the interconnections between new processes for the creation of educational content, and current or emerging theories and practices of instructional design.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
  5. NICHE MARKETS, GLOBAL MARKETS AND PRODUCTIVE DIVERSITY IN THE MARKET FOR PUBLISHED MATERIALS:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    Gutenberg’s invention of printing in the mid fifteenth century represents a commercial as well as a technological milestone. Not only did the printing press point decisively in the direction of mass production techniques based on economies of scale; it also presupposed the development of mass markets. Digital technologies, including digital print to electronic forms of text creation and transmission, are progressively moving the publishing industry in another direction, based on flat economies of scale, mass customisation, and the development of ever more finely grained niche markets based on cultural background, professional focus, personal interest or affiliation to communities of practice. This course explores the notion of ‘productive diversity’ as a conceptual tool for interpreting these developments. Key issues include: market differentiation at a local level, the increasing significance of global markets, and the question of multilingualism in the printing, publishing and communications industries.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
  6. MANAGING KNOWLEDGE AND LEADING CHANGE IN THE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING INDUSTRIES:
    CREATOR TO CONSUMER IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Course Overview
    ‘Knowledge economy’ is a term increasingly used to describe three key aspects of the current phase of economic development. First, the knowledge economy is heavily dependant on technologies which assist the flow of information?within enterprises, between enterprises and between enterprises and consumers. Second, in the knowledge economy, the capital value of an enterprise’s asset base and market value of its tradeable products is increasingly located in intangibles: brand, reputation, business systems, intellectual property, human skills and the capacity of the organisation to capture, systematise, preserve and apply knowledge. And third, human needs in the knowledge economy have been transformed to the point where, in the marketplace, consumers focus on representations as much as they do on physical entities: design, aesthetics, concepts, associations, meanings. The publishing supply chain represents a quintessential knowledge economy industry, with activities ranging from IT businesses facing the challenge of creating viable business models, to traditional manufacturing enterprises facing the challenge of transforming themselves into effective players in the new ‘product-service systems’. Key issues to be addressed in Managing Knowledge and Leading Change In the Printing and Publishing Industries include the changing character of the publishing supply chain, the notion of value chain clustering, and the skills requirements of the ‘knowledge worker’ in the changing business environment.
    Course Framework
    Framework Document
    Course Elements
     Empirical and Experiential Conceptual and Critical Applied and Transferred
    Theme 1 Element 1.1 Element 1.2 Element 1.3
    Theme 2 Element 2.1 Element 2.2 Element 2.3
    Theme 3 Element 3.1 Element 3.2 Element 3.3
 

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